Frequently Asked Questions

What does 'Insurance approved' mean?
What's the difference between an alarm and an immobiliser?
Will an alarm/immobiliser flatten my battery?
My Mates alarm goes off all the time, is this normal?
What happens if I lose my Radio Key and cant switch it off?
Nobody takes any notice of alarms, what's the point?
When I change my bike can I transfer the alarm?
What sort of warranty do you give?
What is the range of a 'radio key'?
Where is Smiffy?
What can you get for 20c in Almeria?

Spike

Helpful Information

Diagnostic Flowchart

Datatool Manuals

System 3 User Guide
System 3 De Spiking
System 3 Programming Remote Controls
System 4 User Guide
System 4 Customisation
System 4 Programming Remote Controls
VetoEvo User Guide
VetoEvo De Spiking
VetoEvo Programming Remote Controls
Snitcher User Guide

MetaSystem Manuals

351A User Guide
357T User Guide
357T-V2 User Guide
357T Reprogramming Guide
357T-V2-1 User Guide
Def Com User Guide
Legos User Guide

 

 


What does 'Insurance approved' mean?

The electronic security products we sell are designed to meet the strict criteria laid down by the insurance companies. They are then tested by Thatcham, an independent test and evaluation company, before being passed for approval. If an electronic product fails any of the tests it is sent back to the manufacturers for modification. The cost of testing these products is in excess of £10,000.

Finally, having passed the product, it can only be fitted by approved, officially trained installers. No insurance approved electronic security device can be sold 'over the counter'; they must only be fitted by an approved installer who will provide a certificate of professional installation to the customer.

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What's the difference between an alarm and an immobiliser?

An immobiliser has to isolate two separate components that are required for the motorcycle to run, i.e. fuel pump, starter motor, ignition unit or any of the control relays. It also has to passively set itself once the ignition has been turned off.

The switching device for the immobiliser must not be able to be bypassed by any means other than with the original 'keys' supplied with the unit.

An alarm system has to do the same as an immobiliser but have a battery back-up siren, be able to sense movement, hot wire detection and have a negative input facility to protect peripherals like panniers etc. It also has to have random coded radio keys to control the system.

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Will an alarm/immobiliser flatten my battery?

No. Under normal circumstances, if your battery is in good condition, your bike can stand idle for weeks without causing any problems. Many of the systems today draw less than three miliamps and will isolate sections of the circuit board, if unused for a period of time, to further reduce their current consumption. The trend is to make bike batteries smaller thus their capacity has been compromised. For those who use their bikes infrequently we suggest attaching a Smart Charger battery conditioner that we can supply.

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My Mates alarm goes off all the time, is this normal?

Not if the system has been configured correctly when it was installed. It is possible to adjust the sensitivity of the unit for optimum performance. Obviously if the bike is parked in a howling gale it is likely to trigger. Movement sensors can be turned down or off dependant on the model and they will all operate as an immobiliser only if required.

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What happens if I lose my Radio Key and cant switch it off?

In the event of losing an alarm radio key, the system can be switched off using your confidential code (known only to the owner). The Meta Systems come with a preprogrammed code (found on the orange code card). The Datatool Systems (Three and Four) come with NO overide code preprogrammed. It can have a pin code of the customer's choice. This MUST BE programmed into the unit, BY YOU the customer using your instruction manual. This pin code is strongly recommended and is essential to enable overide for a system Four.

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Nobody takes any notice of alarms, what's the point?

You will know the sound your alarm makes and that's what makes the difference. Sure, car alarms go off all the time but if your bike is parked outside or in your garage during the night and it goes off, you will recognise the sound. The siren sound can be changed on later Datatool Systems to make it more distinctive and we can also fit a TrakKing to let you know, if you are out of earshot.

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When I change my bike can I transfer the alarm?

It may be possible to take your alarm off of one bike and fit it to another depending on make, model and condition (of alarm and bike!). If you're spending £300+ on a system, it makes sense where feasible.

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What sort of warranty do you give?

We guarantee all systems for three years. It's worth getting the system checked annually, even just to check the functions and make sure you've plenty of life in the radio key batteries. If you're one for pressure washing your bike there's a good chance you'll kill the alarm and that's not warrantable!

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What is the range of a 'radio key'?

Radio keys are licence exempt; they must not transmit a signal over 30m. Various factors influence the useful range, such as large metal objects in the vicinity scattering the signal, other powerful radio signals swamping the air waves; Taxi ranks, air traffic control, radio mast's etc. It's not a common occurrence.

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Where is Smiffy?

Nobody actually knows. Last spotted shipwrecked (run out of 20c pieces!) somewhere around Almeria harbour.

 

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What can you get for 20c in Almeria?

Look and learn - 'The Master' gets his knee down

 

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